quarta-feira, abril 13, 2005

What is the meaning of the rise in popularity of philosophy?

Where's Stephen?" asks Michael Lacewing, scouring the emptying hall. "Ah," he says, spotting his star speaker, "surrounded by six girls - as usual." It's six schoolgirls to be precise, but Lacewing is not trying to be sardonic.
Stephen Law may have huge teen appeal, but he has children of his own and the stage he has just vacated was used for nothing more lascivious than a talk to sixth formers, for Law is a university lecturer and author of two successful books of philosophy for younger readers, The Philosophy Files and The Outer Limits.
Law is but one public face of a remarkable increase in the popularity of philosophy among 16- to 18-year-olds. At the last sitting, 23% more students were answering questions about the theory of knowledge, Plato's Republic or Marx and Engels's The German Ideology in the intermediate philosophy AS examination than in the year be fore. At the same time, 19% more than in 2003 were writing about the philosophy of mind, Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics or Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil for the final A2 exam.
What explains philosophy's increasing popularity? Lacewing is a university lecturer whose company, A-level Philosophy, organises conferences (which I sometimes speak at) for the growing number of students and teachers taking the subject. He thinks it's just a matter of supply catching up with demand. "The meaningful questions of life have always exercised the adolescent mind," he says. "What has changed is the opportunity to express that curiosity."
Graveney, a multi-ethnic comprehensive in Tooting, south London, is a case in point. Until three years ago, when the first 14 teenagers took the new AS course, philosophy wasn't even available. Now, the school has 56 students taking the subject, plus a further 52 taking a philosophy A-level by another name by studying critical thinking or by taking the philosophy of religion and ethics options in religious studies.
The head of philosophy at Graveney, Rebecca Woodhall, says that the subject is "seen as being intellectually macho". Her students confirm this. Sam Watson, who was first turned on to philosophy by The Matrix films, says, "I thought I wasn't being challenged enough before I took philosophy." Lisa Mellany enjoys it because "I really like arguing" and, as her friend Ruth Taylor says, "in philosophy your opinion's worth something".
The subject also has the unusual merit of being interesting for its own sake. "With some subjects you're learning things to write down in exams," says another Graveney student, Alex Crede. "But in philosophy what you're learning you actually find interesting, which makes a change." So
interesting that, as Jim Turner says, "you can leave a philosophy lesson talking about what you did".
These reactions would not surprise Anthony O'Hear, director of the Royal Institute of Philosophy. "I would be inclined to say that philosophy is perennially interesting to young people because it deals with questions many puzzle about in their youth, but which most forget about in the hubbub of adult life." The institute has helped to meet this demand by supplying visiting lecturers to schools, offering grants for conferences, and publishing a journal, Think, aimed at both school students and general readers, which Stephen Law edits.
The philosophy A-level is very different from the philosophy for children (P4C) programmes that have periodically grabbed the attention of the media. P4C is aimed at younger children, from primary school upwards, and centres on a process called "Socratic dialogue" rather than the texts and arguments of the western philosophical tradition. The aim of P4C is to develop critical thinking skills and the ability to discuss issues in groups. While the A-level shares these aims, it is also a pretty heavyweight introduction to the arguments of the greats, from Plato to John Rawls. There is no messing with gentler introductions such as Sophie's World or Alain de Botton.
For the AS examination, theory of knowledge, which deals with the fundamental questions of what knowledge is and whether we know anything at all, is compulsory. This is real, in-at-the-deep-end stuff. You may have no clue what the difference is between foundationalism and reliabilism, or what it means to say knowledge is justified true belief, but plenty of 17-year-olds are perfectly conversant with these ideas, even if it is the part of the course they tend to enjoy the least.
In addition, students choose between moral philosophy and the philosophy of religion, options that tend to fire their enthusiasm because they relate to questions every curious and intelligent teenager asks: Is there a God? Why should I be good? Should I eat meat? They also study a classic text by Plato, Descartes, Marx and Engels, or Sartre.
At A2 level, they will move on to the philosophy of mind, political philosophy or the philosophy of science; study another text by Aristotle, Hume, Mill, Nietzsche, Russell or Ayer; and undertake an extended synoptic essay, in which they draw together related threads of the course according to their own interests.
For those hidden philosophy students who are nominally taking religious studies but in reality are focusing entirely on studying ethics and the philosophy of religion, the syllabus is just as demanding, though perhaps more accessible, due to the absence of the set texts and the theory of knowledge. Issues such as the ethics of abortion, euthanasia and animal rights are guaranteed to spark interest among the students. They also grapple with the arguments for the existence of God and the problem of how a benevolent deity could allow needless suffering, such as that caused by the Asian tsunami.
The interest of sixth formers is being sustained through to the point at which they apply to university. Data from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service shows that overall applications to philosophy degrees rose by 20% between 2000 and 2003, the last year for which admissions data is available, compared with a 7.8% rise for applications in general. Between 2002 and 2003, philosophy applications went up by 15.5%, compared with 3.3% for all subjects.
Brendan Larvor, head of philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire, says he is seeing "more and more students who have done philosophy A-level" among applicants. He sees this as a welcome development, because "most other philosophy undergraduates spend the first year wondering what philosophy is and whether they like it".

Julian Baggini, editor of The Philosopher's Magazine
Tuesday April 5, 2005 in The Guardian

14 comentários:

R.Dart disse...

Desculpem o tamanho do artigo, mas achei interessante partilhá-lo convosco.

Caiê disse...

Acho que depende tanto do syllabus como do profe. A Filosofia, per si, sempre interessou e sempre interessará os adolescentes, mas tudo depende do modo como é dada a conhecer - a Filosofia como discussão das questões mais pertinentes da vida ou como um conjunto de opiniões de mortos?
Já tive oportunidade de discutir isto com alguns teens, uns com muito boas notas a Filosofia e outros que eram uma perfeita nulidade, e as notas eram nada mais que o reflexo do seu interesse pela disciplina... que lhes vinha exactamente do que acabo de expôr (sumariamente, claro).

R.Dart disse...

Claro que depende de tudo quando a mentalidade está para aí virada. A Filosofia interessa a todos em geral, o problema é que uns pensam que ela só trata de sistemas filosóficos complicadíssimos e sem sentido prático. A ideia é que se perceba que filosofia é dar sentido à vida e algumas dessas "opiniões de mortos" continuam tão actuais como as nossas, e a não ser que sejamos génios, não chegamos lá sem os lermos. Espremido é tão simples como isso.
Entretanto, deixa-me dizer-te que chumbei a filosofia no liceu, por isso sei ao que te referes.
Mais um pormaior, a filosofia depende das pessoas e não dos profs, estes só sabem orientar ou passar melhor/pior a mensagem.
Filosofia é por exemplo, o que tb fazes na Gata. ;)
Bjinhos.

Caiê disse...

Ui, ... "O Mundo da Gata Preta" pretende tão só ser uma projecção de pensamentos de uma gata sobre o mundo que a rodeia. Pretende ser anti-teórico, na verdade. No entanto, admito que ela pensa tanto que por vezes pode tornar-se anti-prática. É devastadoramente simples... e cruelmente complexa, creio eu, sem querer. A "dona" deve odiá-la. Lol. ;) :) ***

Vasco Macieira disse...

No entanto, para se ser um bom filósofo não basta ter boas notas a filosofia. Também conheço casos de alunos com boas notas a filosofia porque se limitavam a decorar o que já estava concebido. Mas difícil, difícil é conceber e reinventar conceitos. Não concordam? Rosa, beijos e obrigado pelo artigo. Acabei por excentrá-lo um pouco com este comentário, mas conto que me releves por isso...

Caiê disse...

Sim, em absoluto. Aliás, eu acho que a maior parte dos candidatos a filósofos não prima por ter grandes notas à disciplina... O Einstein também chumbou a Matemática. Como é sabido, os programas escolares não premeiam génios. :)

Caiê disse...

A escola devia ensinar as pessoas a serem pensadores livres, sobretudo. Mas está mais na moda dar-lhes amarras ... infelizmente... :(

R.Dart disse...

Acho que isso se contorna bem. Nunca me preocupei com notas, nem me preocupo para dizer a verdade. Basta-me amar o que faço e isso há sempre quem perceba e incentive.
Eu acho que a escola é necessária para estruturar um pouco, e falo por mim que sou completamente despistada, ser auto-didacta é muito bom e fundamental numa segunda fase, mas há fugas e acaba-se por estagnar sem luzes. A univ encaminha mas não castra, acho que isso é um mito para desculpar más notas (e ouço isso montes de vezes por parte de colegas como se não admitissem que não sabiam). Quem se diz livre pensador não encontra limites ou amarras. Penso eu.

R.Dart disse...

É Vasco, a arte está no mix conseguido pelo conhecimento, na inovação. E daí a tal necessidade em saber-se o passado das ideias para não se cair em repetição.
Acredito que estamos em tempos favoráveis de criação. Em época de pré-caos. As melhores para brainstorming.

Caiê disse...

Desconheço como estudas Filosofia na universidade.Ou seja, desconheço o método dinâmico por detrás dessa licenciatura.
Mas as universidades, em si mesmas, são instituições com uma hierarquia medieval, onde o "livre pensamento" de quem é o último elo da cadeia deve moldar-se a todos os que estão acima dele. Isso tem aspectos positivos e negativos.
Enfim... Sem me querer alongar, direi que um grande mito será o da "universidade como templo do saber". Bem sabemos que 98% está lá em plataforma de procura de solução de vida - económica, social, etc... - mas à procura de "saber" é que não estarão muito poucos...
Quando acabas um mestrado / doutoramento , perguntam-te "mas que queres fazer com isto? " e se a resposta não é algo de concreto em termos economico-sociais, até os académicos te olham com estranheza... hey, bichinho raro! :) **

Caiê disse...

Sorry : "À procura de saber é que estarão muito poucos"

R.Dart disse...

Pois entendo-te.
Na sua grande parte não há culpas, há mentalidades culturalmente perpetuadas, às quais nós já estamos a ficar mais atentos. A aprendizagem hoje está virada para saídas profissionais, é por isso que a maior parte passa o dia no seu trabalho com má cara, porque sentem que não deviam estar ali a fazer o que fazem. Nem imaginas as barbaridades que já ouvi quando digo que estou em Filosofia!
É duro, e por vezes cansativo mesmo. Nada que digas muda alguma coisa, parece que não acreditam que se possa gostar de filosofia e ver futuro nela! Arre! Ora se não fico chateada. ;)

As pessoas deveriam ser incentivadas a fazerem o que gostam e a serem realmente bons para se realizarem como pessoas e cidadãos.

Falava-te acima sobre as univ, isto porque tenho "sorte" por ter turmas minúsculas que permitem muito diálogo, há mais desenvoltura no discurso, mais dúvidas postas, há amizade com professores, um verdadeiro luxo. Mas houve tempos em que isso não acontecia e nem por perto me tiraram convicção. Sempre houve entusiasmo e vontade. Só isto é motor suficiente para o resto.

Os outros, quanto a isso dos materialismos, a mim não me interessam Caiê, só cada um nesta matéria pode tratar de procurar o seu melhor caminho. Não será a criticá-los que os tirarei de lá, será talvez se tentar fazer melhor.
Beijos*

LN disse...

Estranheza por "estar em Filosofia" RDart?
Risos francos - e partilhados, já agora (sou de Filosofia!).
Há-de sempre ser estranho para muitos. Sobretudo, se à Filosofia vier a juntar-se outra(s) coisa(s). Até pela reputação que a Sophia tem. Mas adiante, que a opinião vale que vale!

R.Dart disse...

:))) Boa! Pois é, pois é.
Nós bem sabemos amiga.
Beijinhos!